How to Log Users Login and Logout Details Through Oracle Forms

Log user’s login and logout details in to table through Oracle Forms using POST-LOGON and PRE-LOGOUT triggers to track the user’s login and logout activity for auditing purposes.
Track user login logout activity in Oracle Forms
In this example one table and a sequence object is used to log the data in to table called login_out and the login information would be logged through Post-Logon trigger and logout information would be logged through Pre-Logout trigger in Oracle Forms. Follow the below mentioned steps to perform this task.

1. Create a Sequence object in Oracle Database.

CREATE SEQUENCE login_seq
   START WITH 1
   INCREMENT BY 1
   NOCACHE
/

2. Create a Table in Oracle Database.

CREATE TABLE login_out
(
   srlno     NUMBER (10) PRIMARY KEY,
   loguser   VARCHAR2 (20 BYTE),
   indate    DATE,
   outdate   DATE
)
/

3. Create a Post-Logon Trigger at Form Level in Main Form of Your Application.

DECLARE
   v_seq    NUMBER (10);
   v_user   VARCHAR2 (20) := GET_APPLICATION_PROPERTY (username);
BEGIN
   SELECT login_seq.NEXTVAL INTO v_seq FROM DUAL;
   
   /* this global variable is created to use on pre-logout trigger to update the correspondent record. */
   :Global.login_seq := v_seq;
   
   INSERT INTO login_out (srlno, loguser, indate)
       VALUES (v_seq, v_user, SYSDATE);
   COMMIT;
   
EXCEPTION
   WHEN OTHERS
   THEN
      RAISE form_trigger_failure;
END;

4. Create a Pre-Logout Trigger at Form Level in Main Form of Your Application.

DECLARE
   v_seq    NUMBER (10) := :GLOBAL.login_seq; 
BEGIN
   Update login_out 
      set outdate = SYSDATE
      where srlno = v_seq;
— No need to commit here it will do automatically
EXCEPTION
   WHEN OTHERS
   THEN
      RAISE form_trigger_failure;
END;

Now run the form and after that you can check the login_out table to view the data as following:
SELECT *
  FROM login_out
 WHERE TRUNC (indate) = TRUNC (SYSDATE)
 /
Note: These triggers should added into Main Form only of your application, not in every form.